Crosscut Talks
How the Reversal of ‘Roe v. Wade’ Impacts Washington State

How the Reversal of ‘Roe v. Wade’ Impacts Washington State

June 27, 2022

At a live Civic Cocktail event, Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson and an expert panel discuss the Supreme Court’s decision to end federal protection for abortion.

Roe v. Wade established the right to a safe and legal abortion nationwide. Its reversal means that each state in this extraordinarily divided country of ours will need to decide for itself whether to keep abortion legal, ban it or severely limit it. 

Washington state decided decades ago that abortion access would remain in the state even if Roe fell. But the impact of this decision extends far beyond access. 

What changes lie ahead for clinics and service providers as demand grows from other states? Will legislators reinforce Washington’s laws as other states rewrite theirs? And what should Washingtonians know about the broader implications to their rights going forward? 

For this episode of the Civic Cocktail podcast, Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson, Planned Parenthood regional CEO Rebecca Gibron and State Senator Manka Dhingra attempt to answer those questions.

This conversation was recorded on June 22, 2022.

Civic Cocktail is a production of Seattle City Club and Crosscut.

To receive future conversations like this one in your podcast feed earlier, subscribe to the Civic Cocktail podcast on SpotifyApple PodcastsAmazon, Podbean, or wherever you listen.

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Credits

Host: Mónica Guzmán

Podcast production: Mark Baumgarten

Event production: Jake Newman, Andrea O'Meara

Audio support: Sara Bernard

Safe Water for Everyone with Matt Damon and Gary White

Safe Water for Everyone with Matt Damon and Gary White

June 23, 2022

The actor and the engineer discuss solutions to the water crisis.

Access to clean water is a major issue across the globe. According to a 2020 report from the World Health Organization and UNICEF, 771 million people lack access to safe drinking water. 

This issue has also brought together two unlikely partners, engineer Gary White and actor Matt Damon, in the creation of the nonprofit water.org. Their goal is to help bring an end to this global need in their lifetimes. 

For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, White and Damon describe what drew them to this work while laying out the problem as they understand it. 

In this conversation with Dr. Leah Stokes from the 2022 Crosscut Festival, they also detail how their efforts to facilitate the financing of solutions has made clean water available to more than 40 million people and tell the story of how their work has impacted those who previously spent hours each day securing clean water.

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Credits

Host: Mark Baumgarten

Producer: Sara Bernard

Event producers: Jake Newman, Andrea O'Meara

Engineers: Resti Bagcal, Viktoria Ralph

Ijeoma Oluo on the State of America’s Racial Reckoning

Ijeoma Oluo on the State of America’s Racial Reckoning

June 19, 2022

The author of So You Want to Talk About Race discusses how the conversation around race has evolved since the Black Lives Matter protests of 2020.

The murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police in the spring of 2020 fueled a nationwide conversation about race. It drew hundreds of thousands of protesters into the streets, elicited commitments from businesses to do better when it comes to equity and sent books that tangled with systemic racism, white supremacy and the experience being Black in America up the bestseller lists. 

But two years on, where has all that conversation and commitment led us? And where do we go from here? That is the topic of this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, which features a conversation with author Ijeoma Oluo, whose book So You Want to Talk About Race was central to many of the conversations happening in 2020.

In this talk with Seattle Times journalist Naomi Ishisaka, which took place in early May as part of the Crosscut Festival, Oluo offers a clear-eyed appraisal of the state of race in the country right now. 

Her assessment may not come as a surprise to anyone who has been tracking the faltering efforts to rethink policing in America, the continued inequities in our health care system or the backlash against educators who acknowledge the role that white supremacy plays in our history and culture. But, in addition to seeing things as they are, Oluo also shares what she believes it would take for them to truly change in a meaningful way.

Credits

Host: Mark Baumgarten

Producer: Sara Bernard

Event producers: Jake Newman, Andrea O'Meara

Engineers: Resti Bagcal, Viktoria Ralph

Work Isn’t Working with Sarah Jaffe and Eyal Press

Work Isn’t Working with Sarah Jaffe and Eyal Press

June 16, 2022

Two labor journalists discuss what the Great Resignation, union organization and hybrid models mean for the future of work.

 

Work is a huge part of American life. For most people, it takes up more than a third of their days, at least. And it provides the paychecks that meet their everyday needs. And in America it also provides health insurance. Then, of course, there is the fact that a person’s identity is tightly aligned to what they do when they are on the clock.

So when the pandemic came and upended work, it really disrupted so much more. The reverberations have been significant and include the so-called Great Resignation and newly energized movement toward organized labor. Management, meanwhile, is trying to figure out how to return to some form of normalcy, or whether that is even possible. 

All of these issues are of high interest to the journalists appearing on his episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, Eyal Press and Sarah Jaffe. Both have been studying labor in America since before the pandemic and have recently authored books on different aspects of work in America. 

In this conversation with This Changes Everything host Sara Bernard they explore what the recent disruption has revealed about work in America and whether our current moment is a transformational one.

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Credits

Host: Mark Baumgarten

Producer: Sara Bernard

Event producers: Jake Newman, Andrea O'Meara

Engineers: Resti Bagcal, Viktoria Ralph

Chasing COVID with Trevor Bedford

Chasing COVID with Trevor Bedford

June 15, 2022

The Fred Hutch scientist was one of the first people to explain COVID-19 to the public. Thousands of Twitter followers and a MacArthur grant later, he reflects on what he learned.

In many ways, the world is swimming in information about the pandemic. Two-plus years after the virus was first detected in the United States, the COVID-19 dashboard has become, and remains, a fixture in many Americans' lives. There is still room for more information that would help the public in its battle against the virus, but the need is nothing compared with the early days of the pandemic. 

Those early days are where Trevor Bedford found a new role for himself as a science communicator. A professor in the vaccine and infectious disease division of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Bedford was busy at the start of the pandemic. In addition to his day job, he used Twitter to deliver a steady stream of information on the new threat to a public desperate for it.

Bedford continues to inform the public, now with more than 400,000 Twitter followers and a MacArthur “genius” grant to his name. 

For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, reporter Hannah Weinberger speaks with Bedford about how his particular experience with this difficult period has impacted the way he thinks about his work, communication and the pandemic.

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Credits

Host: Mark Baumgarten

Producer: Sara Bernard

Event producers: Jake Newman, Andrea O'Meara

Engineers: Resti Bagcal, Viktoria Ralph

Our Healthcare System Is Sick with Vin Gupta and Cassie Sauer

Our Healthcare System Is Sick with Vin Gupta and Cassie Sauer

June 12, 2022

The pandemic presented new challenges to U.S. health care. Two experts discuss where the system failed, as well as the advancements spurred by the virus.

For more than two years now, talking about health care in the United States has really meant talking about COVID-19. And yet, health care is so much more than a single virus. And while much of the country watched the dashboards showing the peaks and valleys of COVID infections, hospitalizations and deaths, there were many other statistics that shifted into the background, as stress and delay warped the health care system. 

It wasn’t as if that health care system was perfect in the first place. The pandemic has both exposed and intensified existing problems in our hospitals, including access for some Americans and deep inequities when it comes to race. The pandemic also created new problems, including shortages of supplies and equipment early on, and now, as the country presses through a fourth virus surge, shortages of hospital staff. 

While much of the country attempts to move past the pandemic, the health care industry has no such luxury as health care professionals face continued challenges posed by the virus.

For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, recorded in early May during this year’s Crosscut Festival, journalist Will Stone interviews two of those professionals, Amazon Chief Medical Officer Vin Gupta and Washington Hospital Association CEO Cassie Sauer, about the past two years of sustained stress on the health care system, examining the cracks it has exposed, as well as some silver linings.  

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Credits

Host: Mark Baumgarten

Producer: Sara Bernard

Event producers: Jake Newman, Andrea O'Meara

Engineers: Resti Bagcal, Viktoria Ralph

Introducing the Black Arts Legacies Podcast!

Introducing the Black Arts Legacies Podcast!

June 11, 2022

Enjoy this short excerpt of Crosscut's newest podcast title, which features host Brooklyn Jamerson-Flowers touring the places that have fostered Seattle’s Black artists.

Every episode of the Black Arts Legacies podcast explores the history and ongoing impact of an art spaces in Seattle, the stories of each built around the voices of the artists who claim these places as critical to their development and experts who understand their deep history.

The podcast is part of Black Arts Legacies, a major multimedia project from Crosscut also featuring profiles, original photography, and videos all about Black arts and artists in Seattle. 

Subscribe to the Black Arts Legacies podcast on Apple PodcastsSpotifyStitcher or Google Play.

Are Authoritarians Winning? with Ruth Ben-Ghiat, Rebekah Koffler, Steven Levitsky and David Corn

Are Authoritarians Winning? with Ruth Ben-Ghiat, Rebekah Koffler, Steven Levitsky and David Corn

June 8, 2022
A panel of experts discusses similarities and differences between anti-democratic developments in Russia and the U.S. 

There is a lot to be said about authoritarians right now. Most notably, president of Russia Vladimir Putin has been waging a war in Ukraine that is upending the global order while suppressing dissent at home. 

Even before his attempted conquest of Kyiv, though, Putin’s authoritarian rap sheet was plenty long, replete with intercontinental election meddling and persecution of his political opponents. And the Russian leader is only one of a crop of authoritarians throughout the world.

And then there is the creeping authoritarianism in the United States, most visible in an anti-democratic insurrection by supporters of now-former President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021. 

For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, journalist David Corn explores these threads with an expert panel including U.S. intelligence expert Rebekah Koffler, professor of history Ruth Ben-Ghiat and professor of government Steven Levitsky, all of whom have written recent books that, in one way or another, track the rise of strongmen and their threats to democracy.

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Credits

Host: Mark Baumgarten

Producer: Sara Bernard

Event producers: Jake Newman, Andrea O'Meara

Engineers: Resti Bagcal, Viktoria Ralph

A Republican in the City Attorney’s Office with Ann Davison

A Republican in the City Attorney’s Office with Ann Davison

June 5, 2022

After taking over for her progressive predecessor, Davison discusses how her office will navigate prosecution and public safety.

When Ann Davison was elected Seattle city attorney last November, it flew in the face of the city’s progressive reputation. Electoral races in the city are nonpartisan, but Davison’s identity as a Republican was well-known, and her platform was firmly tough on crime. Her election was a kind of backlash to the backlash. 

Just a year before, in the wake of the 2020 protests over racist policing, Seattle leaders were seriously entertaining the idea of defunding the police. Back then, the idea of a Republican overseeing misdemeanor prosecutions in the city was unthinkable. But in November, Davison defeated a candidate who embodied activist opposition to status quo law enforcement, and in January she replaced a 12-year incumbent who was proudly progressive. 

In the months since, Davison has been actively retooling how the city handles misdemeanor cases, while the concerns over public safety that helped get her into office have continued to grow. She has also made news for a recent decision to dismiss thousands of backlogged misdemeanor cases.

For this episode of the Crosscut Talks podcast, journalist Joni Balter talks with Davison about how, exactly, she is reshaping the office she inherited, why she dismissed those cases and when voters can expect to see the impact of her leadership.

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Credits

Host: Mark Baumgarten

Producer: Sara Bernard

Event producers: Jake Newman, Andrea O'Meara

Engineers: Resti Bagcal, Viktoria Ralph

Safe and Sound: A Conversation with Seattle Police Chief Adrian Diaz and Community Leaders on Public Safety

Safe and Sound: A Conversation with Seattle Police Chief Adrian Diaz and Community Leaders on Public Safety

May 27, 2022

At a live Civic Cocktail event, panelists discussed how city law enforcement might navigate short-term solutions and systemic reforms.

What does it mean to be safe in Seattle, to be shielded from danger or threat so you can live your life fully, without fear, no matter where or who you are? 

It's a big question, as Seattle wrestles with rising crime, an overwhelmed police department, a strained legal system and neighbors fed up and frustrated by everything from distrust around racial disparities to what feels like inaction, bordering on neglect. All with this nagging sense that, after the reckonings of the past few years, we're still not seeing the bigger picture.  

For this episode of Civic Cocktail, host Mónica Guzmán explores how we define and address public safety over the course of two conversations with four guests close to the issue. 

The show begins with three local leaders whose community advocacy gives them each a critical lens on what public safety is all about. Then, Guzmán sits down with the man in charge of the most powerful local institution officially charged with supporting safety in our city, Seattle Police interim Chief Adrian Diaz.

This conversation was recorded on May 19, 2022.

Civic Cocktail is a production of Seattle City Club and Crosscut.

Subscribe to the Civic Cocktail podcast now to receive future conversations in your podcast feed earlier. 

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Credits

Host: Mónica Guzmán

Podcast production: Mark Baumgarten

Event production: Jake Newman, Andrea O'Meara

Video Production: Stephen Hegg

Audio support: Sara Bernard